opticallyaroused:

Perseid Meteor & Milky Way

opticallyaroused:

Perseid Meteor & Milky Way

spacettf:

Clouds and Sunglint over Indian Ocean by NASA on The Commons on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
Clouds and sunglint as seen during the STS-96 mission from the Space Shuttle Discovery. 
Image # : STS096-705-066 

spacettf:

Clouds and Sunglint over Indian Ocean by NASA on The Commons on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Clouds and sunglint as seen during the STS-96 mission from the Space Shuttle Discovery.

Image # : STS096-705-066 

spacettf:

37 Gamma Cygni by tbird0322 on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
Twenty minutes of exposure, (2 X 10), with WO71 and Canon XSi, processed with Photoshop.

spacettf:

37 Gamma Cygni by tbird0322 on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Twenty minutes of exposure, (2 X 10), with WO71 and Canon XSi, processed with Photoshop.


Milky Way from Home by Andrea Pistocchini

Milky Way from Home by Andrea Pistocchini

the-actual-universe:

The Sun is better than artThis incredible image was produced using data from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) taken on January 17, 2003. This is the sun photographed as it was building towards a major eruption.SDO carries imaging instruments that photograph different wavelengths of light released from the sun. If you remember your physics, there is a relationship between the wavelength of light, the frequency of the light, and the energy of the light, so SDO images basically reflect the temperature of the sun.The colors in this shot are 3 different wavelengths of light. Temperature across the sun’s surface and in its corona varies as gases are moved around by convection and by the sun’s powerful magnetic field. Images like this are both gorgeous and help scientists understand the forces churning beneath the surface of the body at the heart of the solar system.-JBBImage credit: NASA Goddard/SDO

the-actual-universe:

The Sun is better than art

This incredible image was produced using data from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) taken on January 17, 2003. This is the sun photographed as it was building towards a major eruption.

SDO carries imaging instruments that photograph different wavelengths of light released from the sun. If you remember your physics, there is a relationship between the wavelength of light, the frequency of the light, and the energy of the light, so SDO images basically reflect the temperature of the sun.

The colors in this shot are 3 different wavelengths of light. Temperature across the sun’s surface and in its corona varies as gases are moved around by convection and by the sun’s powerful magnetic field. Images like this are both gorgeous and help scientists understand the forces churning beneath the surface of the body at the heart of the solar system.

-JBB

Image credit: NASA Goddard/SDO

spaceexp:

The Hubble telescope has just captured this image of a galaxy being violently ripped apart

spaceexp:

The Hubble telescope has just captured this image of a galaxy being violently ripped apart

astronomicalwonders:

The Mystic Mountain - HH 901
This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared-light image of a three-light-year-tall pillar of gas and dust that is being eaten away by the brilliant light from nearby stars in the tempestuous stellar nursery called the Carina Nebula, located 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina. The image marks the 20th anniversary of Hubble’s launch and deployment into an orbit around Earth.
The image reveals a plethora of stars behind the gaseous veil of the nebula’s wall of hydrogen, laced with dust. The foreground pillar becomes semi-transparent because infrared light from background stars penetrates through much of the dust. A few stars inside the pillar also become visible. The false colors are assigned to three different infrared wavelength ranges.
Credit: NASA, ESA

astronomicalwonders:

The Mystic Mountain - HH 901

This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared-light image of a three-light-year-tall pillar of gas and dust that is being eaten away by the brilliant light from nearby stars in the tempestuous stellar nursery called the Carina Nebula, located 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina. The image marks the 20th anniversary of Hubble’s launch and deployment into an orbit around Earth.

The image reveals a plethora of stars behind the gaseous veil of the nebula’s wall of hydrogen, laced with dust. The foreground pillar becomes semi-transparent because infrared light from background stars penetrates through much of the dust. A few stars inside the pillar also become visible. The false colors are assigned to three different infrared wavelength ranges.

Credit: NASA, ESA